News

Wednesday, 20 July 2011 - 00:00

New evidence presented this week at the International AIDS Society Conference in Rome confirms that by expanding eligibility for antiretroviral therapy (ART) we could massively reduce new HIV infections.

At present most HIV-positive people in South Africa are only eligible for ART once there CD4 counts drop below 200 – only pregnant women and people co-infected with tuberculosis are eligible for ART at CD4 counts of 350. World Health Organization...
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Thursday, 14 July 2011 - 16:37

By Vuyiseka Dubula, TAC General Secretary

Being in Durban in 2011, eleven years after the first Aids conference in 2000 was a nostalgic trip down memory lane. The AIDS Conference in 2000 was a defining moment for the struggle for access to treatment.
 
The then South African President, Thabo Mbeki, spoke at the opening highlighting his lack of commitment to fight HIV/AIDS. He raised questions about the relationship between HIV and AIDS. Many people were dying of HIV in South Africa and access to treatment was a dream yet many people living with HIV...
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Friday, 1 July 2011 - 16:27

People with HIV on antiretroviral treatment or at the point where antiretroviral treatment is recommended need not be alarmed by a study that received wide media coverage this week. Antiretrovirals save lives. Their benefits far outweigh their risks.

People with HIV on antiretroviral treatment or at the point where antiretroviral treatment is recommended need not be alarmed by a study that received wide media coverage this week. Antiretrovirals save lives....

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Monday, 27 June 2011 - 00:00

There is a shortage of the life-saving drug amphotericin B across the country. Amphotericin B is on the Essential Drug List and is used to treat cryptococcal meningitis (CM), an AIDS-defining illness with an extremely high mortality rate. Over 7,000 cases of CM are reported annually in South Africa though the actual number of cases is likely much higher. Bristol-Myers Squibb (BMS) is the only company that has registered the drug in South Africa. It is branded as...

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Thursday, 23 June 2011 - 00:00

During a recent door to door campaign, TAC Khayelitsha found that most men are not keen to test for TB or HIV because of long waiting periods associated with overcrowding at the local clinics.

During a recent door to door campaign, TAC Khayelitsha found that most men are not keen to test for TB or HIV because of long waiting periods associated with overcrowding at the local clinics.

TAC Khayelitsha Community Health Advocates (CHAs) together with their counterparts from Mpumalanga and Limpopo undertook a door to door campaign in an area known as SST, an informal settlement...
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